Ingredients
Servings
4
Recipe by
Ariadna Rodríguez, RDN
, photo by
, nutritional review by
Test Kitchen
Nutrition
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Article by
Ariadna Rodríguez, RDN
, photo by
Kick off a lifetime of healthy habits through keto
Personalized Keto meal plans
+1000 delicious, fast & easy-to-follow recipes
LearnEat: A complete Keto diet guide for beginners
Grocery list builder
Go ahead, move one step to your goals
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Did you know that the balance between these two essential fatty acids is key in the development of future inflammatory diseases? That’s right.

What’s the problem?

From an evolutionary perspective, our diet has always provided these fatty acids in a ratio of 1:1, that is, for every gram of omega 3 (ω-3) ingested, there was another gram of omega 6 (ω-6); the problem is that currently the ratio is 1:16 on average, resulting in a higher prevalence of chronic diseases. ⚠️

The main reason is that ω-3 are ANTI-inflammatory and ω-6 are PRO-inflammatory and there always must be a balance between these two.

Inflammation is also important, it protects us, but a chronic excess due to this imbalance is related to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer’s, cancer and other chronic diseases…

So, how can we improve our omega 3 – omega 6 ratio? 😲

Although we should consume more foods rich in ω-3, the main problem lies in the consumption of ω-6, mainly from refined vegetable oils found (but also hidden…) in ultra-processed products (such as sunflower, corn, cotton or soy); its consumption has skyrocketed in the last 50 years.

Where can I find omega-3?

Therefore, we should increase the intake of foods rich in ω-3, such as blue fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines, anchovies, etc.), shellfish, organic meats, eggs, nuts, seeds and/or vegetable oils (not refined!).

Don’t forget that Omega-3 fatty acids have been found to be beneficial for the heart and their positive effects include, among others:

  • Anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant actions
  • Lowering of cholesterol and triglyceride levels
  • Lowering of blood pressure

Medical conditions that benefit from a good intake of omega-3 🏥

These fatty acids can also reduce the risks and symptoms of other disorders, including:

  • Diabetes
  • Stroke
  • Some cancers
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Mental decline

Luckily, for those who are currently following a keto diet, you don’t need to worry about that. 😉 You are probably eating enough Omega-3 to keep your 1:1 ratio for a long period of time.